Art Inspired Conversation of Global Energy Choices: Only In Silicon Valley

Only in Silicon Valley might we find art and an artist who prepares an audience for an insightful discussion of global energy choices. It happens August 28, 2015 at the Nature Gallery in Los Alto, CA.

Michael Killen will share why he created the Dire Consequences (of carbon and methane emissions): Send in the Clowns series of three (15 x 6 foot) paintings, two of which have been displayed by the US Department of Commerce, USGS and at Stanford’s Energy Summit 2015. He’ll show slides of all three paintings including “Gone With the Wind Is the  Electric Grid.’

Ripudaman Malhotra, SRI Fellow and co-author of “A Cubic Mile of Oil” said, “Michael’s words and art should be enough to prepare the audience for my comments on global energy decisions we need to make and on Obama’s Climate Action Plan.”

Both presenters will ask and answer questions.

Art Inspired Conversation of Global Energy Choices

Friday, Aug 28, 2015, 6:30 PM

Nature Gallery
296 State St. Los Altos, CA

4 Members Attending

Please join us for an inspiring conversation aboutthe dire consequencesof Global energy choiceswith Artist, and talk show host, Michael Killenand Scientist Ripudaman Malhotra.Michael Killen’s large format paintings, mostly over 15 feet in length, express his strong opinions on environmental science. The beauty and the shocking imagery serve a…

Check out this Meetup →

About Helps Marketing & Sales Exes Seize Opportunities Created by Energy, Climate & Sustainability Provisions of the Inflation Reduction Act

Provided message-art to the US Dept. Commerce, Dept. Interior, NASA, Gov. CA. Microsoft, Stanford University and other organizations to help them share their climate, energy and sustainability messages, published 100 market research reports, and assisted 700 leaders worldwide share their messages on social media and TV. Michael is the author of five published books, and also the artist who created the Inflation Reduction Series of paintings.
This entry was posted in Bay area art, climate, climate change, energy summit, energy sustainability, Stanford Energy. Bookmark the permalink.

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